The Fashion Dictionary

10.05.2016
Today we're going to be breaking down the language of fashion!

All info from: The Vogue Glossary

Lets be honest, we all don't know what designers, and people who work in the industry are talking about when they say certain things. Sounds like a foreign language to everyday people, right? Well I am here today to help all you confused folk out. Lets dive into the fashion dictionary...


A is for Applique:




Definition: A decorative design made of one piece of fabric sewn on top of another.

B is for Boxy:



Definition: Square in shape with minimal tailoring.


C is for Cap Sleeves:




Definition: A sleeve that sits in between sleeveless and short.


D is for Dirndl Skirt:



Definition: A full, wide skirt with a tight, fitted waistline.


E is for Epaulets:



Definition: A decorative shoulder adornment.


F is for Filigree:



Definition: Ornamental work of fine wire, usually in silver or gold, with the addition of tiny beads.


G is for Gaiter:



Definition: A piece of fabric worn over the shoes, extending to the ankle of the knee.

H is for Herringbone:



Definition: A V-shaped weave resembling the skeleton of a herring fish.


F is for Filigree:



Definition: Ornamental work of the fine wire, usually in silver or gold, with the addition of a tiny few beads.


G is for Gaiter




Definition: A piece of fabric that's worn over the shoe, extending to the ankle and on the knee.


H is for Herringbone:



Definition: A V-shaped weave resembling the skeleton of a herring fish.

I is for Iridescent:



Definition: The property of a fabric that appears to change color as it catches the light.


J is for Jouy Print:



Definition:A white or off-white background on which a repeated pattern, depicting a detailed scene, appears.

K is for Knife Pleat:



Definition: A sharp narrow fold.

L is for Lettuce Hem:



Definition: The result of fabric being stretched as it is sewn, resulting in a wavy hemline.

M is for Mandarin Collar:



Definition: A small, close fitting and upright collar.

N is for Neats:



Definition: Small socks with evenly spaced designs.

O is for Ombre':



Definition: A gradual change of one shade from dark to light (also referred to as degrade)


P is for Paper-bag Waist:



Definition: A loose, pleated waistline that gives the impression of a scrunched bang when gathered at the waist.

Q is for Quarter:



Definition: The section of a shoe that covers the heel.

R is for Raglan:



Definition: The style of a sleeve where a continuous piece of fabric continues to the neck with no shoulder seam.

S is for seersucker:



Definition: A thin, puckered cotton fabric

T is for Trompe L'Oeil:



Definition: An artistic technique where realistic imagery is used to appear three dimensional.

U is for Unitard:



Definition: A skin-tight garment that covers the body from the neck to the wrists and ankles.

V is for Vent:



Definition: A split in a garment to allow for movement

W is for Welt Pockets:



Definition: A pocket set into the garment with a slit entrance as opposed to a patch or flap pocket.

X is for X-ray Fabrics:



Definition: Sheer fabrics with a translucent effect.

Y is for Yoke:



Definition: The part of a garment around the neckline on the front and back.

Z is for Zori:



Definition: A Japanese sandal

I hope everyone enjoyed this post as much I enjoyed creating it all for you to read!

It was quite the lengthy one lol.

With this post I just wanted to give you all an inside look into all the fashion "key terms" so to speak and what we all call certain things in the industry. This was a very fun post to do because I learned a lot that I had no clue on. Since it's such a lengthy post, (even though its just a picture and definition) it took me a while before I uploaded it to the blog. Plus I had to tweak some things because I'm kind of a perfectionist when it comes to my blog you all know that. (If you didn't know... now you know)

I think it's always great to just be aware of things and know the lingo that is being said around you. Like I said I learned a lot from doing this post myself and I hope that I helped someone else by doing this as well.

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